About our ingredients and other fun facts.

What's Belize Like?

Posted by T. Budd on

If you have ever thought about what other country is like Belize, here's what I came up with. Having been to Queensland, Australia a few times, there seems to be many odd similarities. For example: 1. Belize and Australia both have a Barrier Reef.  2. We both have the Queen on the money. 3. We both have exotic animals in our flora and fauna.     They have Cassowaries, we have Harpy Eagles. They have Kangaroos, Wallabies and Wombats. We have Tapirs, Gibnuts and Carasows. They have Coala Bears and we have Kinkajous. We both have deadly snakes. I can keep...

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How Cohune Oil is Made

Posted by T. Budd on

Excerpts courtesy Ambergriscaye.com The ingenuity and traditional practices of colonial communities in Belize have long helped sustain their livelihoods. In some small villages in Belize, the art of cohune palm oil extraction once became a valuable income earner for slaves during the off-season months of the timber trade. The methods used by slaves to process cohune nuts were labor intensive, but today, modern technology is enabling their descendants to produce valuable cohune oil while preserving the local ecosystem. Cohune oil is derived from the kernels of the fruits, or huts, of the cohune palm tree. The nuts, once cracked, are sun-dried...

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Ceiba Pentandra. The Sacred Tree of the Maya.

Posted by T. Budd on

The Ceiba tree, whose name in Maya is Yaaxche, “Green Tree” or “First Tree”, also Kapok is a tropical tree native to Central and South America, as well as west Africa. It usually grows in the wet tropical jungle, savannah, and near rivers.              Different species of ceiba exist in tropical America, and it is one of the highest trees in the Maya area. The ceiba was the most sacred tree for the ancient Maya, and according to Maya mythology, it was the symbol of the universe. Its roots, growing outside the ground surface, reached the...

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Recado: The Spice of Belize

Posted by T. Budd on

Annato, the seed used to create our Caribbean Spice Belize Recado Paste is an orange-red condiment and food coloring derived from the seeds of the achiote tree. Annatto seeds are a main spice component of some local sauces and condiments, such as recado rojo in Yucatán and sazón in Puerto Rico. Annatto paste is an important ingredient of cochinita pibil, the spicy pork dish popular in Mexico. It is also a key ingredient in the drink tascalate from Chiapas, Mexico Annatto is of particular commercial value in the United States because the Food and Drug Administration considers colorants derived from...

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